Great listing photos of your home for sale are a requirement not a bonus.

Camera gear doesn’t guarantee good listing photos. Planning does.

professional photographer for real estate listing photo

There is this urban legend that if a real estate agent buys the right camera, all they have to do is point it at something and press a button, and the end result will be a professional-quality photograph.

I almost always want a better camera, a shiny new lens and maybe a nicer lightweight tripod. It’s easy to spend an entire commission check for selling a small condo — and more — on basic photography equipment.

excerpt from Teresa Boardmansarticle on Inman

 

If you are going to list your home for sale you will need to do everything to make sure your home is presented to potential buyers in the best way possible. Buyers will see you home photos online before making the choice to see it in person. Tech nology is a great thing but buying the TECH TOOLS is not a simple fix: you have to know how to use them.

If you Real Estate Agent takes pictures and you don’t like them ask for new photos to be taken or ask for them to hire a professional photographer in you area.

The Home Search Process. How buyers find homes.

The Home Search Process 2004 – Internet is more important for Realtors now than it ever has been.
Looking at the interactive graph here, there is an obvious increase of people who started their home search online. Indeed, the share of people using the Internet has increased by 28% since 2004. In 2013, 48% of first-time home buyers and 40% of repeat home buyers used the Internet in their home search process.homebuyer graphReal estate agents are mostly preferred by first-time homebuyers for their initial housing search. Especially last year, there was an increase of the first-time home buyers who asked for the services of a real estate agent. This trend shows how increasingly important is the role of real estate agents when there is limited inventory on the market.

Hover over the line graph to see the distribution for each one of the types of home buyers. If you are interested in a particular type of home buyer, please tap on it (see list on the top right corner of the dashboard).

 

See Original Article and very detailed graphs.

Use Social Media the Right Way. Not Just for Realtors.

Targeting your groups is what makes Facebook a great tool for advertising.
Social Media is not JUST a Conversation.
Most of the time a conversation with a possible client is the best way to gather info.
First you have to connect with them. Use Facebook to connect then you can go into the conversation.

Christina Ethridge is the founder of LeadsAndLeverage.com

Experienced Realtors needed on both sides of a distressed property transaction

REO_Short_Sale

The article is a stab at “inexperienced” agents.

A complaint I often hear since the housing downturn is how difficult some REO brokers are to deal with. They are unresponsive, unhelpful, uncommunicative and difficult to transact business with.

I’ll be the first to agree that some REO agents do suck, but I’d like to shed some light on another serious problem in the “real estate owned” and distressed property world. If this issue were properly addressed, it would would dramatically cut down on the headaches and overall angst that go with brokering REOs, short sales, HUD and other distressed properties.

I am a Realtor in Anderson Indiana running into banks that are requesting the properties be listed on the so called “auction sites” that suck. Hubzu in my opinion is one of the sites. It gives the consumer the idea that they are an typical auction site. Normally the bank pay the listing agent a basic fee to list it in the MLS/BLC and do nothing more than put a sign in the yard.

Hubzu then charges the buyer a “technology fee” and sometimes the buyer is responsible to pay the buyers agent fee. The tech fee is paid to Hubzu for processing. Hopefully there are no problems during the transaction because the listing agent can do and knows nothing. They don’t even take listing picture. That is the responsibility of the preservation company.

I make sure to inform all my clients of the pitfalls in dealing with REO properties and especially the ones listed through the crappy auction sites. I just finished a purchase with Hubzu that took 60 days for a cash transaction that should have only taken 14 days. Buyer was ready to close but Hubzu took their sweet time.

See Original Article

 

UPDATE: 11/24/2014

Since the original article was written I am glad that a rep. from Hubzu has contacted me for feedback. We have spoken many times and the result was a gift certificate for the buyer to help mend the relationship for the mishap during the transaction.

I am happy to hear that the company is taking the effort to improve the process for Realtors and Buyers.

Realtors get a chance to voice opinion on Drone usage

The Federal Aviation Administration has invited the National Association of Realtors to participate in a working group that will provide input on forthcoming regulations of “unmanned aerial systems,” or drones.

NAR says it will use the opportunity to “educate FAA officials on how Realtors are interested in utilizing this technology safely and responsibly.”

Drone image via Shutterstock.

Drone image via Shutterstock.

In June, the FAA warned real estate agents who fly their own drones to take pictures or videos of listings that they are not engaged in a “hobby or recreation.” The FAA also provided guidance to hobbyists on the “do’s and don’ts” of flying small unmanned aircraft, citing “recent incidents involving the reckless use of unmanned model aircraft near airports and involving large crowds of people.”

The FAA’s position is that even as it works on the new regulations, it already has the authority to take enforcement actions against real estate agents and others using drones for profit. While the FAA has issued numerous cease-and-desist letters to alleged commercial drone operators, its ability to collect fines against them should it pursue enforcement actions against them remains unclear.

Lawyers with Realogy subsidiary NRT LLC aren’t taking any chances, warning agents who work out of more than 200 offices in the northeastern U.S. not to commission drone photography from vendors until the FAA issues “clearly defined rules” governing the commercial operation of drones. Until that happens, thelawyers said in a July memo, NRT won’t even process or distribute images captured by drones in the affected regions.

NAR says it supports regulations “that would allow members to use this technology safely but that are not overly cumbersome or expensive.”

The trade group expects the FAA to propose regulations in November that would “establish a timeframe” for implementing rules for commercially operated drone flights.

See Original Article